Money

How to Save Money on Home Energy

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Although you can do many free or inexpensive things in and around your home to upgrade its energy efficiency, there are times when purchasing or upgrading something in order to save money on your utility bill can make sense. Think of this as “investing in energy efficiency.”

Here’s an example: If your refrigerator is 15 years old or older, replacing it with a new one could reduce your energy bill by five dollars or more every month: 60 dollars a year. If that new refrigerator costs $600, you’re getting a 10 percent return on your money — much more than banks are paying on savings, checking accounts, or even certificates of deposit. And the extra bonus is that money “earned” on energy savings isn’t subject to state or federal income tax. A 10 percent, tax-free return on a moderate investment? That beats leaving potentially savings-producing money like this in a bank account (where returns are low — and also taxed).

When you invest money and time in projects like replacing windows and updating plumbing, the benefits begin immediately and keep paying off every day for the life of the house. You may save hundreds of dollars in utility bills. In this article, we will show you how to update your heating and cooling equipment, major appliances, and windows to better conserve energy and save more money. We’ll also discuss how you can find a good contractor if you need help with some of these projects. Let’s start by assessing your heating and cooling bills to determine the efficiency of your current home systems. http://tpt.to/a2dRgrs

How to Save Money on Home Energy

Posted on

Although you can do many free or inexpensive things in and around your home to upgrade its energy efficiency, there are times when purchasing or upgrading something in order to save money on your utility bill can make sense. Think of this as “investing in energy efficiency.”

Here’s an example: If your refrigerator is 15 years old or older, replacing it with a new one could reduce your energy bill by five dollars or more every month: 60 dollars a year. If that new refrigerator costs $600, you’re getting a 10 percent return on your money — much more than banks are paying on savings, checking accounts, or even certificates of deposit. And the extra bonus is that money “earned” on energy savings isn’t subject to state or federal income tax. A 10 percent, tax-free return on a moderate investment? That beats leaving potentially savings-producing money like this in a bank account (where returns are low — and also taxed).

When you invest money and time in projects like replacing windows and updating plumbing, the benefits begin immediately and keep paying off every day for the life of the house. You may save hundreds of dollars in utility bills. In this article, we will show you how to update your heating and cooling equipment, major appliances, and windows to better conserve energy and save more money. We’ll also discuss how you can find a good contractor if you need help with some of these projects. Let’s start by assessing your heating and cooling bills to determine the efficiency of your current home systems. http://tpt.to/a2dRgrs

Stop Blowing Money On Energy Costs—Here Are 6 Ways To Lower Your Bills

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A new study from Whirlpool and Harris Interactive reaches a less than startling conclusion: “Consumers Are Looking to Save.”

Reminds me of this story from satirical newspaper The Onion, “Save Money by Taking a Vacation Entirely in Your Mind!”

Fortunately, the rest of the study is more interesting than the title – it’s actually about how people want to save on energy costs, and it gives some good tips. Here are some of the stats…

25 percent of people who want to save on energy use don’t know how much their appliances consume 15 percent seek out green products 49 percent would consider paying extra for an appliance that would lower their utility bills over time

And here’s some practical advice, combined with some of our own quick fixes… http://tpt.to/a2gwhNM

What can you do to your car to save fuel?

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Fuel prices are on the rise, and those fill-ups are no trivial expense. Once you leave the station, that gasoline has a strong environmental impact. In the United States, cars and trucks cause more air pollution than any other factor. Motor vehicle emissions are responsible for almost half of the smog in our air, which directly affects our health. In cities, these emissions are linked to respiratory illnesses like asthma and bronchitis.

Switching to a more fuel-efficient vehicle can make a big difference in your car’s gas mileage, but not everyone is ready to go out and buy a new car. For drivers who want to save on gas without getting a brand-new vehicle, there are some kits and options to help improve your car’s fuel economy. http://tpt.to/a2fqNlQ

12 Ways to Save $12 a Day in 2012 ~ LockerGnome

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We’re just a few days a way from the beginning of 2012, which means millions of people around the world are resolving new attitudes, goals, new fitness routines, and diet plans. With the current state of the economy, many are also brainstorming new budgets and ways to save a little money. If you’re hoping to break even in 2012 — or at least stop breaking the bank — here are 12 ways to save at least $12 a day in 2012. http://www.lockergnome.com/social/2011/12/21/12-ways-to-save-12-a-day-in-2012/

Can Using Coupons Actually Hurt Your Budget Goals? ~ LockerGnome

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We have all heard (via the TV, a newspaper article, or a magazine) about the lady who buys an incredible amount of groceries for just pennies on the dollar. Her secret is what has become known as extreme couponing, a process that allows the coupon’s user to purchase a week’s worth of groceries for next to nothing, or in some cases for nothing at all. But are the hours you spend hunting and tracking down these savings worth the effort? http://www.lockergnome.com/blade/2011/12/22/can-using-coupons-actually-hurt-your-budget-goals/

Boost Your Career with Social Media: Tips for the Uninitiated

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You’ve heard the horror stories: a job applicant gets turned down because his potential employer discovered his objectionable tweets, or saw pictures of his keg party on Facebook. There is a lot of advice out there about keeping your online activity from hurting your career. But there’s a flip side. When handled correctly, social media can help you professionally. You can use it to enhance your personal brand, establish yourself as an expert in a field, or demonstrate fluency with all things digital. The key is to be proactive about managing your activity and image. http://tpt.to/a2dlC5X